Merimbula Imlay Historical Society remodeled their museum entirely.

Curator Elizabeth Bretherton and her husband Don, the president of Merimbula Imlay Historical Society. Photo: Amandine Ahrens
Curator Elizabeth Bretherton and her husband Don, the president of Merimbula Imlay Historical Society. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

People of the Far South Coast are invited to pay a visit to the new artifacts laid out in the revamped exhibition at the Merimbula Imlay Historical Society museum.

Lots of work has been done in the process of remodeling the exhibits and the society is excited to reopen the Old School Museum on Sunday, February 28 at 1.30pm.

After having been open only three weeks in the last 12 months, the museum has used the time to do some necessary cleaning after the Black Summer bushfires.

A large number of artifacts were rediscovered in the roof of the annexe, behind the museum, during a clean up of ashes from the fires.

Curator Elizabeth Bretherton said she was very excited by this recent discovery and that several of the artifacts found will now be on display.

Ms Bretherton described the new changes in the historic museum as being unlike anything previous visitors would have seen.

"Everything will be different, we have completely dismantled the whole museum," she said.

As visitors enter the venue they will notice that the room to the left of the entrance has been transformed into a re-creation of the old school room, with items that had been found underneath the floors of the property.

The room that had once held the infamous Mrs Mac shop re-creation has been transformed into an exhibition of oyster plates.

Ms Bretherton showed immense gratitude towards local historian Angela George and her family who recently donated a large number of historic items from the George family collection, some of which will add to the oyster plates exhibition.

The largest display will be held in the original old schoolroom and is named "The Story of Merimbula".

Old Pambula newspaper once known as 'The Pambula Voice'. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

Old Pambula newspaper once known as 'The Pambula Voice'. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

It features a timeline of artifacts dating back to the First Nations people, then early settlers, moving on to relics from old local businesses.

There are old birthing and delivery room tools from the Pambula hospital, and type settings from the original Pambula newspaper, which merged with the Eden Magnet during the second world war due to a shortage of paper.

There is also a display of the first air hostess costume from the Merimbula Airport - the uniform had belonged to a local girl in 1967.

First air hostess costume from Merimbula airport in 1967, featured in 'The Story of Merimbula' exhibition. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

First air hostess costume from Merimbula airport in 1967, featured in 'The Story of Merimbula' exhibition. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

There is also a collection of belongings and photographs from local identities such as the Munn and Schafer families, among others.

In the adjoining room beside "The Story of Merimbula" exhibition, there will be a display covering mining in the area.

Within is a curious exhibit - a child's boot that had been found washed up in a tree after a flood in the area.

Photo of the child's boot in the mining display. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

Photo of the child's boot in the mining display. Photo: Amandine Ahrens

Ms Bretherton said the society felt it was necessary to revamp the museum, as members of the local community were scarcely visiting the museum anymore, due to it remaining "the same".

In response to this, Ms Bretherton announced that the museum will be featuring a rotating selection of displays, changing over every 9-12 months.

She said the society would greatly benefit from more volunteers and this could lead to turning displays over more frequently.