Victor Crouin wins Australian Open in Bega

Australian Open winner Victor Crouin (front) looks for a backhand option in his semi-final win over Addeen Adrakie at the Bega squash courts on Saturday.

Australian Open winner Victor Crouin (front) looks for a backhand option in his semi-final win over Addeen Adrakie at the Bega squash courts on Saturday.

Top-seeded Frenchman Victor Crouin has taken out the Australian Open of Squash in straight games.

Crouin looked every bit one of the top 70 players in the world when he defeated Malaysia's Mohd Syafiq Namal - the number two seed - in three games 11-8, 11-5 and 11-4 to secure the top men's prize on Sunday afternoon at the Bega squash courts.

Stewart Boswell was the last Australian to win the national Open with the Canberran taking out the 2009 title with Crouin's win rounding out a decade of international dominance in the country's richest squash event.

Surprisingly, Crouin had been better pressed in his semi-final encounter with Addeen Idrakie on Saturday with his Malaysian opponent battling well for points to steal away a game.

Both the men's and women's finals played in front of a packed gallery on Sunday with officials saying they had never seen the Bega courts so crowded before.

It's incredible when you have an Open like this in a small town, you find a lot of passion for the sport in areas like this.

Meanwhile, the women's final played out in favour of second-seed Sivasangari Subramaniam of Malaysia after downing Japanese contender Satome Watanabe in four sets.

Earlier, Watanabe had shocked the number one seed with a loss in the semi-finals on Saturday, downing Rachel Arnold of Malaysia in a five-game thriller.

Squash fans had been wowed by some immense competition across the five days of play with two 24-player knockout draws running concurrently at the Bega courts.

Many - including players - remarked that they did not envy the referees who were put in the predicament of being able to call play by some of the world's best.

Incredible shots off the backboard, minutes-long rallies and incredible placement were part and parcel of the dizzyingly intense play throughout.

With a large part of the competing field staying on to watch the finals, many players said it was great to play in a town that shown enormous interest in the event.

"It's incredible when you have an Open like this in a small town, you find a lot of passion for the sport in areas like this," one player remarked during Crouin's semi-final win.

Officials said they were thrilled with the response from players, but also the support of the community behind the event.

The club will be looking to retain rights to host the Australian Open again in 2020.