Urban farm : Growing food for the future

Keeping it local: From Little Things President David Barrie hopes more people will be inspired to join in the urban farm movement. Photo: Rachel Mounsey
Keeping it local: From Little Things President David Barrie hopes more people will be inspired to join in the urban farm movement. Photo: Rachel Mounsey

The From Little Things Parklands urban farm, a seed that was planted just three years ago is now over flowing with abundance. The bowling green turned rooftop garden is full with all kinds of produce, leafy greens, eggplants, garlic, parsley, chilli -you name it, it's there.

When we arrived to chat to FLT President David Barrie about future projects we found him knee deep in black soil turning over beds in preparation for the winter season. The smell of the soil, cool and rich, is the kind of veggie garden smell that draws you in and makes you want to plant a seed or two.

"Well there's always room for more gardeners" Mr Barrie said turning the black earth.

"With the situation the planet is facing - it's time for us to pull our sleeves up and join together. An urban farm is the type of project where we can combat climate change in a healthy and positive way," he added.

In the face of climate change Mr Barrie is maintaining optimism.

"As humans we are very resilient, we can work together and combine our efforts. The old saying little hands make light work is true, the more we come together the easier it will be."

Mr Barrie said he believed there were many social, educational and economic benefits to be gained through the urban farming model. A model that has been practiced successfully in communities all over the world.

Flowing with abundance: Just a few of the garden beds at the urban farm

Flowing with abundance: Just a few of the garden beds at the urban farm

"Allotment style and market gardening has been huge in Europe and the UK. And although it can be seen as 'trendy' it's not trendy. It's important.

"Those places that started growing their own food 30 years ago are benefitting from it now. It keeps food in the community and makes the future more localised," he said.

"Urban farming means food is grown in town by communities which means we not only lower our carbon footprint. Connections are made, people learn about growing food, people are fed and everything stays within the community."

The From Little Things team have big plans for the future and Mr Barrie said he would love to see more people inspired to get involved.

"This is a space for everyone to come together, interact and get the feel for urban farming. We hope to develop more community engagement through community art, school visits and creating disability access."

"If everyone gives a little then we all gain a lot."

Working Bees are held Thursday- Fridays from 8.30am - 10.30am. Sundays, 8 am - 12 midday. For further information phone 0490511898 or visit From Little Things Parklands Facebook page.