“Swampy” the swimming wallaby rescued by WIRES

Far South East Branch WIRES volunteer Janine Green with holiday maker Carrissa who initially saw the wallaby in distress.

Far South East Branch WIRES volunteer Janine Green with holiday maker Carrissa who initially saw the wallaby in distress.

We don’t jump to the thought of kangaroos and wallabies having any sort of swimming ability, but surprisingly they do.

It was unknown as to how long one swamp wallaby was swimming for at Merimbula on Wednesday, October 3.  

Holidaying in Merimbula from Griffith with her family, Carrissa Campbell saw the wallaby swimming and showing signs of distress.

She promptly called the WIRES Hotline where Far South East Branch WIRES volunteer Janine Green came to the rescue.

The rescue became urgent as the young female wallaby was thoroughly exhausted and faced a fast incoming tide.

Ms Green rescued the tuckered out wallaby, providing it with warmth and comfort.

Often kangaroos and wallabies will enter the water or cross an inlet for a reason –  to migrate or to avoid predators. 

How do they swim? On land they hop moving their hind legs together, however when in water they will kick each leg independently to swim with their swishing tail movements helping to drive them forward.

Tuckered out swamp wallaby who was named 'Swampy'.

Tuckered out swamp wallaby who was named 'Swampy'.