Bubble soccer: contact required, goals optional

Bouncing around: Sapphire Coast Anglican Students take part in a match of bubble soccer presented by the PCYC recently. Picture: Aimee Hay.
Bouncing around: Sapphire Coast Anglican Students take part in a match of bubble soccer presented by the PCYC recently. Picture: Aimee Hay.

Wyndham Public School will be full of laughter on Thursday, December 14, when the Police Citizens Youth Club (PCYC) and Merimbula Lions Club bring bubble soccer to the playground.

Bubble soccer is just like regular soccer, however, all participants must wear a giant inflatable bubble.

This leads to a number of comedic collisions between the players, and often the game becomes a quest to knock down as many opponents as possible rather than score goals.

PCYC Far South Coast Club Manager Jason Hough explains why the event is coming to Wyndham.

“The Lions Club held a Halloween disco down at Merimbula, and as a part of that, all the primary schools had to come up with decorations,” he said.

“Wyndham won the award, so the prize was a bubble soccer event as part of their end of school celebrations.”

The event is just a small part of the PCYC calendar. The club, formerly known as the Police Boy’s Club, run a number of events and programs all up and down the South Coast.

“We’re an outreach club,” Mr Hough said. “Our intention is to give youth in the community some activities to do.”

“Through doing that, we connect with youth in the community, and also at-risk youth.”

While the PCYC is now technically separated from the police force, Mr Hough said the police still had links to the organisation.

“I’ve got police actively engaged in what the PCYC is doing, even though they no longer work for the club,” he said.

“From that traditional police side, it’s creating an environment where kids they’re working with can come to things they wouldn’t usually have access to.

“The whole purpose is to engage with these youth and provide positive experiences for them.”

And Mr Hough said the positive results are easy to see.

“It does have a real impact, particularly on creating positive environments for some of the kids who don’t necessarily have access to them,” he said. He said the activities can help kids in a poor family environment or those with limited access to transport.