Council mediates at Tura

Following six deputations about the future of the North Tura Coastal Reserve council has agreed to adopt an extensive list of actions even though agreement has not been reached on all points, between the two groups involved at North Tura.

The two groups are the North Tura Beach Residents Association which has pressed for a more managed approach to parts of the reserve, including emergency access, and the Living with Nature group which favours a totally natural approach to reserve management.

Both groups made presentations to council at the meeting of October 11 and as a result council adopted the actions outlined in Attachment 4 of its report on the matter subject to annual budgets, successful grant funding and staff resources.

Council also agreed to re-establish the emergency access previously provided at Dolphin Cove and The Point and re-establish native grasses that have been colonised by invasive species such as sallow wattle, kikuyu and African love grass.

It is expected that council will rely heavily on the interest and goodwill of the community to get much of the work carried out.

Speaking after the council meeting, Chris Young of the North Tura Beach Residents Association said they were pleased with the outcome.

“It certainly strengthens the plea for emergency access and egress for the Dolphin Cove residents,” Mr Young said.

“Overall  we are pleased that a majority of councilors understand our position regarding the unmanaged re-growth at The Point and Dolphin Cove,” Mr Young added.

Libby Hepburn from Living with Nature said that as Tura Beach developed “the strip up to the headland has become more important as a wildlife corridor”.

“We ask you make councils position clear and we will help to work with council to replant,” Ms Hepburn said.

It is well known now that isolated areas reduce the health of the wildlife. Paths should be paths not wide roads. Amenity is the nature itself,” Ms Hepburn added during her presentation.