Merimbula’s seahorse statue removed | PHOTOS, VIDEO

After more than 40 years looking over the Lake, Merimbula’s much-loved seahorse statue has been removed from its home. 

But this is not goodbye, the seahorse will be back. 

Because of the bypass works and the need to have a clear road around the new intersection it has been removed from its current residence but it is expected to be given a new somewhere on the corner of Monaro and Market Streets.

This is the second time Merimbula’s seahorse statue in the southern end of Market Street has been moved since it was first installed in 1974.

Owned by Lyn Brunning, it was originally installed in the Merimbula Square arcade, an area underneath McDonalds and was later moved to the garden bed in Market Street.

In 1971 the partners in Merimbula Square commissioned Melbourne sculptor Michael Meszaros to create a seahorse statue for their new retail development.

Cast in bronze by the Burnell Foundry in Melbourne it is based on the local variety of seahorse as found in Merimbula Lake.

Janice Wilson daughter of the foundry owner, was in Merimbula recently to see the statue before it was moved.

Sculptor Michael Meszaros is a renowned artist and his work includes medallions, reliefs, trophies, portraits and major public commissions. His medallions attracted attention while he was still a student at the University of Melbourne.

Janice Wilson with the seahorse statue by sculptor Michael Meszaros, that her father cast in his Melbourne foundry.

Janice Wilson with the seahorse statue by sculptor Michael Meszaros, that her father cast in his Melbourne foundry.

Meszaros was only eighteen when the Hague Museum of Medals in Holland selected one of his medallions for its collection.

His numerous public sculptures include the large welded copper piece, Birds for St James Plaza, St Kilda Road, Melbourne, 1974, and a bronze portrait statue of John Pascoe Fawkner for the Melbourne City Council in Collins Street, Melbourne.

Landscaping plans not set in concrete